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Appearance & Reality

What is truth and what is deception?

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  1. V.T. response HELLO AGAIN!!!!

    16th of May 2008

    Many characters in the play employ disquise and/or deception. The first disquise was when Don Pedro dressed up as Claudio in order to woo Hero in his name. I believe it was justified in a way because he was trying to help his best friend. But at the same time he could of just went to Leonato and talked to him without disquising himself to Hero. It effects the outcome because if Don Pedro wouldn't have hooked Claudio and Hero up, then Hero wouldn't have gotten slandered on her wedding day. The next deception was when Don Jon told Claudio that the Prince wooed Hero for himself. It wasn't justified because he only did it for revenge, and it didn't effect the outcome because it backfired. One of the most biggest "deceptions", I believe, is when Benedick and Beatrice are tricked into believing they're in love with one another. To me, it was justified because it wasn't really a deception. They truly did love each other. It effects the outcome because they end up getting married. But the biggest deception of them all is when Claudio is tricked into believing Hero cheated on him. It wasn't justified seeing as it was done for money and revenge. It effects the outcome because it causes Hero to get slandered at her wedding. The last deception is when Claudio believes Hero is dead. It was justified because Claudio slandered Hero so I guess you could say he was payoing the price fir that. And it effects the outcome because in the end Hero and Claudio get married.

  2. Disguise and Deception

    16th of May 2008

    There are people who use disguise or deception in good ways in MAAN. There are also characters who use Disguise or deception in a bad way. YOu can either have a good reason or a bad reason for useing disguise or deception. DOn Pedro, Claudio, and Leonato use Deception to trick BEnedict into admitting his love for Beatrice. THis a good thing to do becasue he is now happier than he was before. Hero and Ursula use decepton to trick Beatrice into admitting her love for Benedict. Now she is also much happeir than before. Than you have the bad guys who have no reason to use either disguise or deception but revenge. Don Jon and Borachio use deception to trick Claudio into thinking that Don Pedro woos Hero for himself and not claudio. They had no reason to do thid but to get revenge on Claudio for beating DOn Jon. They also use deception to trick CLaudio into thinking that Herohas slept with another man the night before her wedding and a thousand time more than that. Once again Don Jon and Borachio had no reason to do this but revenge at Claudio for beating Don Jon and not falling for their last plan.You need good reasons to use disguise or deception other than Revenge. There was also some disguise in MAAN. Even though she did not know her part in getting revenge at Claudio Margret was disguised as Hero. The only reason Claudio and Don Pedro believed she was Hero because it was dark and they could not see her very well. DO use disguise you also need a good reason just like deception. Although sometimes you are disguised as someone but do not know it. Disguise or Deception can be really powerful tools.

  3. TF

    16th of May 2008

    In Much Ado About Nothing there are many characters who employ deception. Don John is the main character that employs deception. He almost riuned Hero and Claudio's relationship. When Don Pedro was trying to woo Hero for Claudio he acted as though he was Claudio to fool Hero. When Claudio and Don Pedro talked about how Beatrice loved Benedick while he was eavesdropping.this changed the outcome of the story because Benedick would not have stood up for Hero and would have played a part in the slandering.i think that all of them are justified inwhat they did except for what Don Jonh did to Claudio ang Hero. if it wasn't for Don Pedro wooing Hero then non of these things would have happened

  4. SCJ's response

    16th of May 2008

    In William Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing," the character Don John employs deception. These are the reasons why. During the war, Don John almost succeeded in overthrowing his brother. If it wasn't for Claudio, he would've succeeded but he didn't. Don John obviously wasn't to happy about this so throughout the book, he has been decieving people because he likes to start trouble. His first villianous act was somehow convincing Claudio into thinking that The Prince (Don John's Brother) was wooing Hero for himself. Since Claudio was disguised in a mask, Don John thought that he was Benedick and Claudio answered to Benedick. Claudio believed him because he appeared sincere. That little scheme didn't work so he devised a plan to destry Hero and Claudio's wedding by staging a false encounter with supposed Hero and another man when in reality it was Margaret and someone else. Don John appeared to care about their Claudio and pretended to do the right thing when in reality he was deceiving everyone and was pretending the whole time. These are the reasons why DOn John's character employs deception in William Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing."

  5. K.G - Deception and Disguise

    7th of May 2008

    In, “Much Ado about Nothing,” by William Shakespeare, there are several characters that employ disguise and deception. Some of the characters are justified, while others are not. The acts of disguise and deception used in the play greatly affect the outcome entirely. Most of the characters disguise themselves in some way, whether it is for good or evil. One person that uses disguise for good is Don Pedro. Another person that uses deception is Don John, but uses it for evil. Disguise can be used for both good and evil. One that use disguise for good in, “Much Ado About Nothing,” would be Don Pedro. In the scene at the party, Don John disguises himself as Claudio. His intention of disguising himself was to get Hero to like Claudio, and it worked. Claudio knew about the plan and wanted Don Pedro to do it, so it was a justified use of disguise. If Don Pedro didn’t do this it wouldn’t really have affected the play as much. An example of an evil use of disguise would be what Don John staged with Borachio and Margaret. Don John made it look like Margaret was Hero, and Borachio was having sex with Hero (Who was really Margaret). Don John goes and tells Don Pedro and Claudio who both see it and are fooled by Don John. This is an example of disguise used for evil because later on in the play, Claudio does not marry Hero because he thinks she is unfaithful to him. Since Don John did this just to be mean, it was un-justified and if he didn’t do this, Claudio and Hero would’ve gotten married the first time around and Hero wouldn’t had to fake her death. Deception can also be used for either good or evil. Leanato, Claudio, and Don Pedro all use deception for good in Act 2 Scene 3 in, “Much Ado About Nothing.” All three of them stage a conversation for Benedict to overhear. They say that Beatrice is deeply in love with him, and Benedict believes them. Margaret and Hero basically do the same thing to Beatrice too. They stage a conversation for Beatrice to overhear, and they say that Benedict is deeply in love with her. Beatrice also believes Hero and Margaret and all five of them (Claudio, Leanato, Don Pedro, Hero, and Margaret) wanted to get Benedict and Beatrice together again, so they are justified. If they didn’t stage conversations for Beatrice and Benedict to overhear, they might’ve not have fallen in love. Leanato uses deception in an evil way in, “Much Ado About Nothing,” too. Leanato fakes Hero’s death because he is ashamed that is daughter was not a virgin before marriage. Leanato does not tell Claudio that Hero isn’t really dead, and Claudio feels really bad about what he did to her at the wedding. This use of deception was un-justified and if Leanato didn’t do it, there could’ve been an easier way to find out if Hero was really unfaithful or not. Deception and Disguise both can be used for evil or for good. In the play, “Much Ado About Nothing,” by William Shakespeare there are many characters that use deception and disguise. Some characters are justified in doing so, and others are not. If the deception and disguise that took place during the play didn’t happen, there could’ve been a totally different outcome.

  6. Deception and Disguise in Much Ado About Nothing

    7th of May 2008

    In, “Much Ado about Nothing,” by William Shakespeare, there are several characters that employ disguise and deception. Some of the characters are justified, while others are not. The acts of disguise and deception used in the play greatly affect the outcome entirely. Most of the characters disguise themselves in some way, whether it is for good or evil. One person that uses disguise for good is Don Pedro. Another person that uses deception is Don John, but uses it for evil. Disguise can be used for both good and evil. One that use disguise for good in, “Much Ado About Nothing,” would be Don Pedro. In the scene at the party, Don John disguises himself as Claudio. His intention of disguising himself was to get Hero to like Claudio, and it worked. Claudio knew about the plan and wanted Don Pedro to do it, so it was a justified use of disguise. If Don Pedro didn’t do this it wouldn’t really have affected the play as much. An example of an evil use of disguise would be what Don John staged with Borachio and Margaret. Don John made it look like Margaret was Hero, and Borachio was having sex with Hero (Who was really Margaret). Don John goes and tells Don Pedro and Claudio who both see it and are fooled by Don John. This is an example of disguise used for evil because later on in the play, Claudio does not marry Hero because he thinks she is unfaithful to him. Since Don John did this just to be mean, it was un-justified and if he didn’t do this, Claudio and Hero would’ve gotten married the first time around and Hero wouldn’t had to fake her death. Deception can also be used for either good or evil. Leanato, Claudio, and Don Pedro all use deception for good in Act 2 Scene 3 in, “Much Ado About Nothing.” All three of them stage a conversation for Benedict to overhear. They say that Beatrice is deeply in love with him, and Benedict believes them. Margaret and Hero basically do the same thing to Beatrice too. They stage a conversation for Beatrice to overhear, and they say that Benedict is deeply in love with her. Beatrice also believes Hero and Margaret and all five of them (Claudio, Leanato, Don Pedro, Hero, and Margaret) wanted to get Benedict and Beatrice together again, so they are justified. If they didn’t stage conversations for Beatrice and Benedict to overhear, they might’ve not have fallen in love. Leanato uses deception in an evil way in, “Much Ado About Nothing,” too. Leanato fakes Hero’s death because he is ashamed that is daughter was not a virgin before marriage. Leanato does not tell Claudio that Hero isn’t really dead, and Claudio feels really bad about what he did to her at the wedding. This use of deception was un-justified and if Leanato didn’t do it, there could’ve been an easier way to find out if Hero was really unfaithful or not. Deception and Disguise both can be used for evil or for good. In the play, “Much Ado About Nothing,” by William Shakespeare there are many characters that use deception and disguise. Some characters are justified in doing so, and others are not. If the deception and disguise that took place during the play didn’t happen, there could’ve been a totally different outcome.

  7. Lots of characters

    7th of May 2008

    Everyone does

  8. Lots of characters

    7th of May 2008

    Lots of characters employ disguise and deception. One is Don John who is not justified in trying to make Claudio not marry Hero. Another character isLeonato who is justified in making Claudio end up marrying Hero without knowing she is still alive. Then there is Don Pedro (the Prince) who is justified by making Hero fall in love with Claudio. A set of characters is Don Pedro with Caludio and Leonato who are justified in making Benedick fall in love with Beatrice. Another set is Hero with Ursula who are justified in making Beatrice fall in love with Benedick.

  9. deception

    27th of Apr 2008

    Decption is probably one of the majour themes of the play it,s brought into the play a hell of a lot the charecters are constanly deceiving each other the fist time is probbly when claudio asks don pedro to woo hero for him they are both deceiving hero there But claudio is also decived when don jhon treis to convince claudio that don pedro is trying to woo hero for himself . I think perhaps is with beatrice and benedick they in my opinion always like each other a bit under neath the suface escpically when they banter but they were both deceived by there freinds into falling in love with each other. I think the most obvious part of the play whre deceptionis used is used when the frair francis persaueds leanarto to pronouce to everyone that hero is dead it perceives everyone including claudio but they carry on this deception right up to the last part of the play in the second part of the play everyone is pretty much deceived in this play at one point or the other i think shakesperare wanted to put across the piont that you cant trust anyone if those people that you are close to

  10. Philosophical view on the question

    9th of Apr 2008

    It depends on the person perspection of truth and deception. The truth might have been a deception. For example Claudio thought he was telling the truth when he was declaring Hero's unfaithfullness. We know he was under Don John's deception. See the truth changes all the time. The perseption of truth changes for example we still not absoutley sure about Shakespeare. So we what we now take as the truth with further research could be false.

  11. Everyone?

    7th of Mar 2008

    is there anyone who doesn't pretend stuff?

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